Behind the scenes: Share prices for companies and exchange-traded funds (ETFs)—Sharesies Australia
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Behind the scenes: Share prices for companies and exchange-traded funds (ETFs)

Explainers

Let’s take a look at investing in companies and exchange-traded funds through the Sharesies platform.

15 November 2021

4 min read

Behind the scenes: Share prices for companies and exchange-traded funds (ETFs)

We’ll cover how share prices work for these investments, and why the price you see when you place an order is likely to be different to the price you end up buying or selling at.

An overview of share prices 

‘The market’ is where investors come together to buy or sell shares—for example, the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) or New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). When you place an order in your Sharesies account for a company or ETF, the order goes on market.

On one side of the market, you have the buyers with their bids (the highest amount they’re willing to pay per share), and on the other side, you have the sellers with their offers (the lowest amount they’re willing to accept per share). This lineup of buyers and sellers is called the ‘market depth’.

Let’s look at an example:

A diagram showing buyers' bids and sellers' offers. The difference between the lowest offer and highest bid is the spread.

On the buyer side, you can see someone willing to buy 700 shares at no more than $2.55 per share. On the seller side, you can see someone wanting to sell 150 of their shares at no less than $2.58 per share. The difference between what buyers are willing to pay and what sellers are willing to accept at any given time on the market is called the 'spread’.

A trade occurs when a buyer and seller match on a price. This happens when either the seller lowers their offer to meet a buyer’s bid, or when the buyer increases their bid to meet a seller’s offer.

What’s the last traded price? 

On the Sharesies platform, you can see the last traded price delayed by at least 20 minutes. This means that the price you see is likely to be different to the price you end up buying or selling at.

The last traded price changes every time a trade happens, as long as that trade is above a certain threshold set by the exchange—this means that some smaller trades don’t change the last traded price. A trade that meets this threshold and is big enough to change the last traded price is called a price-setting trade.

What are market orders and limit orders?

There are two types of orders that you can place—market orders and limit orders.

Market orders are typically used when investors want an order to be processed quickly and are willing to let the market decide the price. When your order is placed on the market, the platform checks to see if there’s a buyer or seller at (or near) the last traded price for that share. If not, it tries to get you the best available price, without causing any issues in the market. To do this, means reviewing the last traded price, market conditions, and availability of buyers or sellers. Adjustments are made until a price to trade is found at the limit that’s set. You can read about this in our best price policy in Sharesies.

Limit orders give you more control to buy or sell shares at a specific price, or better (in line with our best price policy). When you place a buy limit order, you can set a maximum price that you’re willing to pay for a share. When you place a sell limit order, you can set the minimum price that you’re willing to sell at. Note that for US shares, you can’t place a limit order for a fractional number of shares—you can only buy whole shares when placing a limit order.

When I place a market order, is the price I see in the Sharesies platform the price I’ll get?

The last traded price you see when you place a market order is likely to be different to the price the order goes through at. It all depends on the buyers and sellers in the market.

Here’s our example again, this time with the last traded price added:

A diagram showing the last traded price in addition to the spread (the difference between the lowest offer and highest bid).

Now, let’s look at some possible market order scenarios:

“I thought I was buying at $2.56 per share, but I ended up buying at $2.58.”

Although the last traded price in our example is $2.56, the lowest offer in the market is $2.58. If you place your buy order now, it would trade at $2.58.

“I thought I was selling at $2.56 per share, but I ended up selling at $2.55.”

Although the last traded price in our example is $2.56, the highest bid in the market is $2.55. If you place your sell order now, it would trade at $2.55.

“It says I bought at $2.58 per share, but the share price never went to $2.58 on that day.”

In this situation, it’s likely that your trade was not a price-setting trade, so it didn’t change the last traded price. The same concept applies for sell orders.

For limit orders, your limit order will go through when the share price hits the limit price you’ve set. Your order can wait on-market for up to 30 days, but might not get filled if the market doesn’t reach the price you’ve set, or if there are orders ahead of yours.

We hope this has given you a better idea of how share prices for companies and exchange-traded funds work on the Sharesies platform! If you have any more questions about this, please get in touch at help@sharesies.com.au.


Ok, now for the legal bit

Investing involves risk. You aren’t guaranteed to make money, and you might lose the money you start with. We don’t provide personalised advice or recommendations. Any information we provide is general only and current at the time written. You should consider seeking independent legal, financial, taxation or other advice when considering whether an investment is appropriate for your objectives, financial situation or needs.

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